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The symptoms of Morton’s neuroma

Morton’s neuroma, also known as Morton’s metatarsalgia or Morton’s syndrome, is characterized by the compression, then swelling, of plantar nerves between the toes – most often occurring between the third and fourth toes. The resulting friction causes swelling and pain.
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The symptoms of Morton’s neuroma

Morton’s neuroma, also known as Morton’s metatarsalgia or Morton’s syndrome, is characterized by the compression, then swelling, of plantar nerves between the toes – most often occurring between the third and fourth toes. The resulting friction causes swelling and pain.
Contact us to make an appointment

The symptoms of Morton’s neuroma

Morton’s neuroma, also known as Morton’s metatarsalgia or Morton’s syndrome, is characterized by the compression, then swelling, of plantar nerves between the toes – most often occurring between the third and fourth toes. The resulting friction causes swelling and pain.

What are the most common causes?

Although the precise cause of neuromas is uncertain, several factors are suspected, among them poorly fitting footwear (heels that are too high, tight or pointy shoes, thin soles) or activities involving repetitive foot motions (skiing, dancing or running). Thickening of the tissue around the nerves after an injury or irritation can also cause the condition. Morton’s neuromas affect adults and are clearly predominant among women (75%).

What are the symptoms?

Morton’s neuroma presents as discomfort or numbness, and even as burning or sharp pain that is made worse when standing or walking. Removing shoes and massaging the foot usually eases the symptoms fairly quickly.

How is it diagnosed?

The patient’s description of the symptoms and a clinical examination usually result in diagnosis. Various specific tests, such as an ultrasound or MRI, can also be done to identify or locate the neuroma(s). An X-ray may be done to discount or detect other pathologies.

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