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The symptoms of an arthritis in the shoulder

The term "arthritis," reserved for such inflammatory diseases as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasitic arthritis, often affects several joints at once. These conditions are usually followed and treated by family doctors and rheumatologists. Osteoarthritis is not considered as a metabolic disease, but rather as a result of normal aging, or secondary to a previous injury.
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The symptoms of an arthritis in the shoulder

The term "arthritis," reserved for such inflammatory diseases as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasitic arthritis, often affects several joints at once. These conditions are usually followed and treated by family doctors and rheumatologists. Osteoarthritis is not considered as a metabolic disease, but rather as a result of normal aging, or secondary to a previous injury.
Contact us to make an appointment

The symptoms of an arthritis in the shoulder

The term “arthritis,” reserved for such inflammatory diseases as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasitic arthritis, often affects several joints at once. These conditions are usually followed and treated by family doctors and rheumatologists. Osteoarthritis is not considered as a metabolic disease, but rather as a result of normal aging, or secondary to a previous injury.

What are the most common causes?

Like most of the main joints in the body, the shoulder is subject to degenerative changes and the development of osteoarthritis. It can be due to aging alone (usually after 60) but can also result from an old injury or chronic rotator cuff deficiency (“secondary” arthrosis).

What are the symptoms?

Oddly enough, shoulder function can continue unimpeded in some case, even when X-rays reveal an advanced condition. This is because half of the shoulder’s movements are enabled not by the glenohumeral joint, but by the gliding motion of the scapula over the thorax; thus, patients generally retain their autonomy of movement.

The symptom that will most often prompt a medical consultation is pain. We should differentiate between occasional or positional pain, which is often treated non-surgically, and chronic, debilitating pain, which will require more invasive treatment.

“Primary” glenohumeral osteoarthritis can appear in the early 50s, and is generally better tolerated than osteoarthritis of the hip or knee (perhaps because we don’t walk on our hands!) It develops slowly over a long period of time with an increasing feeling of stiffness and slight pain upon completion of movements.

How is it diagnosed?

Basic X-rays will reveal a narrowing of the space between the head of the humerus and the scapula glenoid, as well as bone spurs (osteophytes). In advanced cases, the humeral head will lose its spherical shape and rotary movement becomes impossible. CT scan will be best to assess the bone deformity, and MRI will show both bone changes (less accurately than CT scan) and tendon involvement.

X-ray

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Five months after my operation, despite the severity of my wound, I am again able to ride a bike without difficulty or pain. I had an impeccable and attentive follow-up from Dr. Beauchamp. Thank you!

A few client testimonials

Don’t just take our word for it: read on to see what our patients have to say!

« After enduring pain in my left shoulder for 18 months, I went to see Dr. Beauchamp. A few days later I walked out of surgery. It was the best investment I’ve ever made! »

« One of the best investments I ever made! He operates only as a last resort and takes the time he needs to explain everything. Very human and the best orthopedic surgeon I’ve ever seen. »

« Very professional, human, likeable. The smartest investment I ever made. One week after the initial consultation, Dr. Beauchamp and his team of professionals operated on me. Four months later, I am 90% recovered. He is worth his weight in gold. »